I joined the police for moments like this; to save people, to be there for someone who has no one else.

As I was driving into work, I came across a man who looked very distressed and was standing on the wrong side of a road bridge railing, peering down into the traffic below.

I was immediately on the alert, realising that this man was going through some sort of crisis.

He was looking down and crying hard, so I stopped my car and ran towards him.

As I was in civilian clothes, not in uniform, he wouldn’t have known that I was a police officer. Luckily, I had my radio with me.

I begged him not to jump, and I told him that if he gave me a chance, I would do whatever I could to help him.

He told me he had enough and that he wanted to jump; that he couldn’t take the pain any longer and that he had been crying out for help, but no one was listening to him.

Seeing him so distraught, and shaking, and thought to myself, I need to convince this man to give me a chance.

I said to him: “Let me make one call, I promise you I will help you”, and I said this over and over to him.

He began shaking again, and I thought he would let go of the railing, so I pressed the emergency button on my radio.

My team mates quickly responded, and closed the road down to stop the traffic.

I showed my radio to the man and said “Look, I am getting help for you, just give me a chance”.

Once the man heard the chatter over the radio, he began walking to a safer spot on the bridge.

Shortly, another officer arrived on the bridge, and we both grabbed hold of him, and took him to a place of safety where he will get the help he so badly needed.

I joined the police for moments like this; to save people, to be there for someone who has no one else, to help people with their problems, and to be someone a vulnerable person can look to and ask for help.

Working as part of a team and helping people that need it the most.

PC 610 Naseeb Khan
Team 3 North Response

Whether you’re concerned about yourself or a loved one, there are mental health charities, organisations and support groups that can offer expert advice and help.

Anxiety UK

Charity providing support if you have been diagnosed with an anxiety condition.

Phone: 03444 775 774 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am to 7.30pm; Saturday to Sunday, 10am to 2pm)

Website: www.anxietyuk.org.uk

Bipolar UK

A charity helping people living with manic depression or bipolar disorder.

Website: www.bipolaruk.org.uk

CALM

CALM is the Campaign Against Living Miserably, for men aged 15 to 35.

Phone: 0800 58 58 58 (daily, 5pm to midnight)

Website: www.thecalmzone.net

Men’s Health Forum

24/7 stress support for men by text, chat and email.

Website: www.menshealthforum.org.uk

Mental Health Foundation

Provides information and support for anyone with mental health problems or learning disabilities.

Website: www.mentalhealth.org.uk

Mind

Promotes the views and needs of people with mental health problems.

Phone: 0300 123 3393 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm)

Website: www.mind.org.uk

No Panic

Voluntary charity offering support for sufferers of panic attacks and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Offers a course to help overcome your phobia or OCD.

Phone: 0844 967 4848 (daily, 10am to 10pm). Calls cost 5p per minute plus your phone provider’s Access Charge

Website: www.nopanic.org.uk

PAPYRUS

Young suicide prevention society.

Phone: HOPELINEUK 0800 068 4141 (Monday to Friday, 10am to 10pm, and 2pm to 10pm on weekends and bank holidays)

Website: www.papyrus-uk.org

Rethink Mental Illness

Support and advice for people living with mental illness.

Phone: 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am to 4pm)

Website: www.rethink.org

Samaritans

Confidential support for people experiencing feelings of distress or despair.

Phone: 116 123 (free 24-hour helpline)

Website: www.samaritans.org.uk

SANE

Emotional support, information and guidance for people affected by mental illness, their families and carers. 

SANEline: 0300 304 7000 (daily, 4.30pm to 10.30pm)

Textcare: comfort and care via text message, sent when the person needs it most: www.sane.org.uk/textcare

Peer support forum: www.sane.org.uk/supportforum

Website: www.sane.org.uk/support

YoungMinds

Information on child and adolescent mental health. Services for parents and professionals.

Phone: Parents’ helpline 0808 802 5544 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am to 4pm)

Website: www.youngminds.org.uk

My ambition is to help this force achieve excellence

At Bedfordshire Police everybody matters; every person in the chain matters and we all add value to the objective, which is to keep people safe.

We are a small cardre of Superintendents and Chief Superintendents and the expectation is that you can do lots of different things and that you’re omnicompetent across different areas. There’s responsibility of the entire force sitting on your shoulders at times and relationships with other people are important to get the job done. But there’s lots of room for ideas, innovation and for thinking of how we can do things better and differently.

My ambition is to help this force achieve excellence and I think everybody who works here wants the force to be excellent.

There are pockets of excellence everywhere I look and some really superb people, working against the odds at times, to achieve some fantastic outcomes.

When I joined Bedfordshire Police I was put into a role that suited my skills, which is something that is nice to have happen to you. Often in policing you’re just put in a job and not much account is taken of your skill set and your experience, nothing could be further from the truth at Bedfordshire Police. The Detective Chief Superintendent at the time, sat down with me and found out about me, what I’m good at, what skills I have and gave me, in my opinion, the best job in the force.

It was good to feel valued, to have someone look at what I’ve done in the past and think you can add real value for us in this role.

I transferred to Bedfordshire Police after spending 18 years in the Met. Moving out of the Met was a big decision for me but it was fuelled by wanting to work for my home force and help make the county I live in be the safest place for my family. Another driver was the opportunities available by being a part of a tri-force collaboration and working with teams in Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire, as well as the potential for secondment this gives.

Bedfordshire has metropolitan problems but with county level, rural funding and it felt most closely aligned with my experiences in the Met. Luton feels very much like a London borough; the problems and the challenges are very similar.

I felt it was like something I know and can bring value to.

Julie Henderson, Detective Superintendent.

Our Superintendent and Chief Superintendent recruitment process is currently open, applications close on Sunday 4 October. If you would like to join Bedfordshire police please visit www.bedfordshire.police.uk/superintendents