“I thought I’d never be able to fulfil this dream…”

I wanted to be involved with the police from a young age – my uncle was a police driver in Northumbria and often when we visited he’d show us the police cars which I found really exciting.

As I went through school I got involved with sports coaching, and on the recommendation of one of my teachers I moved into teaching. I qualified in 1996 and started work straight away. I began my career, and gradually moved my way up to a point where starting a new career would have been difficult.

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Helping those living with dementia

I wanted to be a PCSO as I’m from a policing background – my mum and dad were both police officers. As well as meeting people from the community and helping to deal with local issues, one of my favourite parts of my job is doing dementia visits. I’ve been doing them for about two years now and I’ve probably been to see about 60 people in that time.

A dementia visit is basically going to see someone who is living with dementia and taking as much information as we can, and keeping a record of their information on our police systems. This means if they go missing, we already have a lot of crucial information on file and can start the search faster.

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What 40 years in force looks like

blog2I joined the force in 1976 when female officers were known as Women Police Constables (WPCs). It was a completely different era Life on Mars was quite accurate. Although WPCs were allowed on section, which was a fairly new way of working, we were still tasked with dealing with ‘women’s issues’, which involved dealing with any female or child victims. There were very few women in the force, in fact it was a rarity to have one on each section and when I joined I was the only woman on my intake.

WPCs had to wear skirts; there were no trousers, a box style hat, double breasted jacket and a cape, which didn’t keep you warm or dry at all. It was quite different from the heavy kit officers have to carry around today. Female officers were also given a long handled handbag to carry their small custom made truncheons.

I remember it being said ‘it would probably be best to keep it in the handbag and swing the handbag if you needed protection, the only use the truncheon would be for is breaking windows.’ The men were given much longer and more suitable truncheons.

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