My ambition is to help this force achieve excellence

At Bedfordshire Police everybody matters; every person in the chain matters and we all add value to the objective, which is to keep people safe.

We are a small cardre of Superintendents and Chief Superintendents and the expectation is that you can do lots of different things and that you’re omnicompetent across different areas. There’s responsibility of the entire force sitting on your shoulders at times and relationships with other people are important to get the job done. But there’s lots of room for ideas, innovation and for thinking of how we can do things better and differently.

My ambition is to help this force achieve excellence and I think everybody who works here wants the force to be excellent.

There are pockets of excellence everywhere I look and some really superb people, working against the odds at times, to achieve some fantastic outcomes.

When I joined Bedfordshire Police I was put into a role that suited my skills, which is something that is nice to have happen to you. Often in policing you’re just put in a job and not much account is taken of your skill set and your experience, nothing could be further from the truth at Bedfordshire Police. The Detective Chief Superintendent at the time, sat down with me and found out about me, what I’m good at, what skills I have and gave me, in my opinion, the best job in the force.

It was good to feel valued, to have someone look at what I’ve done in the past and think you can add real value for us in this role.

I transferred to Bedfordshire Police after spending 18 years in the Met. Moving out of the Met was a big decision for me but it was fuelled by wanting to work for my home force and help make the county I live in be the safest place for my family. Another driver was the opportunities available by being a part of a tri-force collaboration and working with teams in Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire, as well as the potential for secondment this gives.

Bedfordshire has metropolitan problems but with county level, rural funding and it felt most closely aligned with my experiences in the Met. Luton feels very much like a London borough; the problems and the challenges are very similar.

I felt it was like something I know and can bring value to.

Julie Henderson, Detective Superintendent.

Our Superintendent and Chief Superintendent recruitment process is currently open, applications close on Sunday 4 October. If you would like to join Bedfordshire police please visit www.bedfordshire.police.uk/superintendents

In my opinion, there’s no other job like it

Detective Constable Dave Brecknock has been a police officer for almost thirty years, working on high profile cases and in a number of specialist roles. Here he tells us how his passion for investigation means that being a detective is the best job in the world.

I’d been working as a silk screen printer, but knew factory life was not for me, and I wanted to do something that made a difference to people’s lives.

One day, a police officer knocked on my door during house to house enquiries about a murder in the local area, and we got talking. It was him who suggested I should apply, and he even brought the information pack and application form round for me to fill in.

After I’d completed my basic training, I joined Bedfordshire Police full time in July 1992, and my career began as a beat constable in Luton town centre, and later in Marsh Farm. 

Dealing with the public in the town and surrounding communities, I did my best to make it a better place to live and work for all the people I met.

Along the way, there were further training opportunities which saw me qualify as a firearms officer, a self-defence instructor, an advanced driver and motorcycle officer, a surveillance officer and a financial investigator.

I also qualified as a scene of crime officer (SOCO), a specialist search and exhibits officer, a bomb scene manager. I trained in public order, and in methods of entry – yes, I got to put doors in with a big red key!

Over the years, I have been seconded to New Scotland Yard as part of an investigation into a terror plot, and I worked on the London tube bombings investigation in a counter-terror unit representing Bedfordshire.

I also got to work in a regional crime investigation team working on cross border crime in surveillance and investigation.

Is it as exciting as it sounds? You bet it is, and the support and training you receive in policing can’t be bought or experienced in the civilian world. Of course, there are difficult times, and unpleasant tasks, but the training and support are there to equip you to handle it.

I always thought that working in Special Branch was the pinnacle of my career, but moving to CID opened my scope for investigations and I embraced life as a detective.

One of my later cases featured in the award-winning television series “24 Hours in Police Custody”. The Detective and The Surgeon told the story of a four-year investigation and an eighteen-week court case, which all started with the report of a burglary and some stolen antiques.  The surgeon is now serving eight years for fraud and perverting the course of justice.

There is still no other job like policing. Once you are in, and if you want it, you will always have the opportunity for promotion, or if you find a department or a specialism that interests you, aim towards getting a job within it.

We are recruiting for our Accelerated Detective Constable Programme now, and if you are looking for a career like no other, then visit our ADCP information page to find out how you can apply.

Closing date for applications is Sunday 26 July.