In my opinion, there’s no other job like it

Detective Constable Dave Brecknock has been a police officer for almost thirty years, working on high profile cases and in a number of specialist roles. Here he tells us how his passion for investigation means that being a detective is the best job in the world.

I’d been working as a silk screen printer, but knew factory life was not for me, and I wanted to do something that made a difference to people’s lives.

One day, a police officer knocked on my door during house to house enquiries about a murder in the local area, and we got talking. It was him who suggested I should apply, and he even brought the information pack and application form round for me to fill in.

After I’d completed my basic training, I joined Bedfordshire Police full time in July 1992, and my career began as a beat constable in Luton town centre, and later in Marsh Farm. 

Dealing with the public in the town and surrounding communities, I did my best to make it a better place to live and work for all the people I met.

Along the way, there were further training opportunities which saw me qualify as a firearms officer, a self-defence instructor, an advanced driver and motorcycle officer, a surveillance officer and a financial investigator.

I also qualified as a scene of crime officer (SOCO), a specialist search and exhibits officer, a bomb scene manager. I trained in public order, and in methods of entry – yes, I got to put doors in with a big red key!

Over the years, I have been seconded to New Scotland Yard as part of an investigation into a terror plot, and I worked on the London tube bombings investigation in a counter-terror unit representing Bedfordshire.

I also got to work in a regional crime investigation team working on cross border crime in surveillance and investigation.

Is it as exciting as it sounds? You bet it is, and the support and training you receive in policing can’t be bought or experienced in the civilian world. Of course, there are difficult times, and unpleasant tasks, but the training and support are there to equip you to handle it.

I always thought that working in Special Branch was the pinnacle of my career, but moving to CID opened my scope for investigations and I embraced life as a detective.

One of my later cases featured in the award-winning television series “24 Hours in Police Custody”. The Detective and The Surgeon told the story of a four-year investigation and an eighteen-week court case, which all started with the report of a burglary and some stolen antiques.  The surgeon is now serving eight years for fraud and perverting the course of justice.

There is still no other job like policing. Once you are in, and if you want it, you will always have the opportunity for promotion, or if you find a department or a specialism that interests you, aim towards getting a job within it.

We are recruiting for our Accelerated Detective Constable Programme now, and if you are looking for a career like no other, then visit our ADCP information page to find out how you can apply.

Closing date for applications is Sunday 26 July.

How a major enquiry shaped the future of victim care in Bedfordshire


A new sexual assault referral centre (SARC) for Bedfordshire has been heralded as a centre of excellence in the provision of facilities for victims of rape and sexual assault.

A standalone, purpose-designed facility, it contains two state-of-the art, fully equipped forensic examination suites which, while being technically compliant, are designed to put victims at ease by having a less clinical ambience than a hospital or medical centre. The centre also boasts tailored facilities for adults, teens and children, and working spaces for SARC staff and police officers.

But roll the clock back three decades and you’d see a very different landscape in the investigation of such cases, and in victim care.

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“I will do my best to raise as much as I can and make the charity proud.”

I grew up in London and had always intended to run the London Marathon, but life happened; I moved out of the city, joined the army, and then the police service. I’ve watched it year after year and have always thought it would be an exciting event to take part in.

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